Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 74
  1. #16
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C

    LED Bulb Upgrade

    Below is a listing of the Superbrightleds.com bulbs that I used to replace the stock incandescent bulbs:

    Tail/brake: 1157 to 1157-R18-T
    3rd brake: 912 to WLED-RHP13-T
    Turn signal (rear): 1156 to 1156-A18-T
    Reverse: 1156 to 1156-CW18-T
    Side marker (rear): 194 to WLED-R5
    License plate: 168 to WLED-W-120
    Inner marker/turn (front): 1157A to 1157-A18-T
    Outer marker/turn (front): 1157A to 1157-A18-T

    I chose the specific 18-LED bulbs listed because of a Youtube video I found that showed the improvement on a 1968 Cougar’s tail lights (http://youtu.be/XUkNCAKwE-g). These LED bulbs have 3 LED’s that fire straight off the end of the stem and 15 LED’s that fire radially out from the stem, the 15 LED’s shine on the reflector surface of the housing and fill the whole lens area to mimic the stock incandescent bulb perfectly. The LED’s also come on much faster than the incandescent bulbs, which during braking should help someone behind you to react a bit quicker and potentially avoid an accident. My incandescent bulbs weren’t bad, but they were far from great. My main goal was daytime visibility along with the quicker speed at which the bulbs lit.

    When you swap LED’s into your turn signal circuit, your stock electro-mechanical turn signal flasher won’t work properly. The electro-mechanical flashers require a certain amount of electrical current to work, since they have a bi-metal spring that heated by that current to activate the on-off function. Some folks add load resistors to their turn signal wires to mimic the incandescent circuit’s current. Personally I don’t like the concept, since another benefit of LED’s is that you reduce your current draw/load of your car, so why reverse that benefit. I simply changed my electro-mechanical flasher for an electronic flasher unit that doesn’t care about the amount of current to operate. I found an electronic flasher from Napa online that was a direct plug-in replacement, it was model “NF EL12L1”. I only had to hook up the flasher’s ground wire to a chassis ground right next to the fuse panel, very easy.

    The bulb installation was straightforward for the twist bulbs, while the wedge-base bulbs needed the contacts modified per the supplied instructions. The modification was just moving the contact wires from one side of the base to the other side, very simple. My friends have commented that the bulbs are not only quicker to come on, but do appear to be brighter and easier to see in daytime conditions, so I feel I have accomplished my goal of this project. The total cost for my project, which included 16 bulbs and 1 flasher unit was ~$240, so it wasn’t a ‘cheap’ upgrade…but if it prevents someone from running into the back of my car it has more than paid for itself.

    For my own home-made video of my lights in action you can go to: http://youtu.be/ScSYDZFP-xQ

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - Bulb_LED_Brake Comparison.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	88.9 KB 
ID:	42730Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - Bulb_LED_License Comparison.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	66.5 KB 
ID:	42731Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - Bulb_LED_Tails_01.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	79.7 KB 
ID:	42732Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - Bulb_LED_Tails_02.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	77.8 KB 
ID:	42733Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - Bulb_LED_Tails_03.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	83.8 KB 
ID:	42734Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - Bulb_LED_Tails_04.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	80.4 KB 
ID:	42735
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  2. #17
    OVER-BOOST!! gbeaird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Pearland, Texas
    Posts
    2,045
    SVO's: '86 2R
    Nice work! I have added LEDs on the interior of our 95/96 GM B-bodys, and really like them. The definite added bonus is the lower heat output of these bulbs. I pulled lights out of the already-melted sockets on several locations of our cars, so protecting them from further heat abuse as the cars age is a big plus. Thanks for posting up the part numbers for this. Expensive, yes, but even if you drive the car only at night, every night of your life, these bulbs _should_ not ever have to be replaced.

    The wheels look great. Just about the best-looking replacement for the stock wheels, IMHO. We'll probably stick with the factory wheels, only getting them re-finished, and opt for something like some CCWs for autocross purposes, should we run the car much any more.

    Your ride looks awesome!
    Gene Beaird,
    86 2R SVO, G Stock,
    Pearland, Texas

  3. #18
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C
    Gene, thanx for the compliments, must appreciated. Funny thing is, I haven't ever replaced anything but a headlight on this car since I picked it up, so longevity of the LED's is almost a moot point, but I get where you are coming from. The Youtube video really shows the reaction time difference between the two bulb styles, where the incandescent never actually goes fully off compared to the LED, which gives such stark on-off cycle.

    I waited many, many years for a 'good' looking wheel that would actually fit right. The offset on the 05-14 Mustangs is what finally did it to get these.

    The title of my project is 17 years and counting, this month it will now be 22 years and counting, so when you have a 'toy' this long, you get to work on a lot of little details.
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  4. #19
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C

    Walbro 255LPH High Pressure Fuel Pump w/Fuel gauge sending unit #1

    • The fuel pump portion is almost a ‘normal’ kind of upgrade on most SVO’s and the gauge sending units are a likely maintenance need. Since I was dropping the tank, I figured I would replace most everything that required dropping the tank. Do it once and be done I say.

    • I actually upgraded from a 155lph Walbro pump to a 255lph Walbro high pressure pump during this exercise in spring 2009. I had installed the 155lph unit back in 1993 and it was working fine, but I had concerns about the condition of the 23 year old fuel pump sending unit the pump was attached to. I located a Spectra Premium brand fuel pump sending unit (#FG30A) from an Ebay vendor, the 255lph HP pump from APE and the lock ring and seal from Latemodel Restoration Supply. The first thing I noticed about the Spectra unit was that the supply/return hard line nipples where the hoses slide on were swaged down in diameter to create a smooth radius for the hose connector o-rings to slide over. They seemed a bit over swaged and I felt the small diameter would cause a restriction in the system, not what I wanted. I don’t have the specific numbers noted down, but seem to remember that the 1/4” supply line’s hole was less than 3/16” and the 3/16” return line was less than 1/8”. I drilled out the swaged tips to the full inner diameter of the unit’s rigid tubing and still had a smooth tip on the tubes to keep from damaging the fuel line o-rings. I flushed out all the metal chips from the lines and moved on to mounting the pump. The pump bolted into the new sending unit frame, but the frame did need a little ‘tweaking’ of the side flanges to hold the pump body tight and not let it rattle around in the units flanges. I then aligned the pump so the pre-formed rubber line sat as molded without any kinks or stress and snugged up the hose clamps. Then I connected up the pump’s electrical harness and butt spliced the wires to the sending unit’s wires. I held off pushing on the pump’s sock filter till I pulled the installed unit out of the tank to ensure I had it on in the right orientation. Now it was time to drop my tank to get access to the pump and gauge sending units. I would suggest getting your tank to 1/2 full or less to do this w/o spilling gas all over your garage. Be VERY CAREFUL around your open tank, gas fumes are HIGHLY FLAMABLE, so you don’t want to cause any sparks or spill the gas as you could do serious injury or kill yourself during this part of the upgrade!! With that said you may want to consider having an extra set of hands to assist you with the removal of the tank. I removed my tank, both times, by myself but with the use of a floor jack and some cargo straps to act as a second set of hands. Start by getting the car up in the air and stable. Then hook up the cargo straps under the tank next to the tank support straps and place your jack as necessary. Now unscrew the fuel filler neck screws inside your fuel filler door and also unscrew the filler neck strap from the tank flange, so it can move around and slide out of the tank. Unscrew the tank support straps and remove. I moved the cargo straps into the grooves of the tank straps to help keep them from sliding and disconnected the tank’s harness plug. Now start SLOWLY lowering the tank by loosening the cargo straps one at a time and going back and forth between the two. You will need to lower the driver’s side of the tank more than the passenger side till you slide the filler neck out of the tank. Once you get enough clearance on top of the tank, disconnect the evaporative vent line from the chassis hard line, disconnect the fuel supply and return lines from the tank’s sending unit, make sure you have some paper towels or rags handy to soak up the fuel that will come out. I also tied the loose lines up to the filler neck retaining strap to keep them from draining additional fuel from the system. Now that the tank is free from everything lower it all the way to the ground and stuff something in the fuel filler neck hole of the tank to reduce the amount of fumes, I found a foam stress ball worked nicely. Next I scraped, cleaned and vacuumed all the crud that had accumulated on top of the sending units to prevent if from falling into my tank when I pulled them out and disconnected the two harnesses. I also sprayed some WD-40 on the locking rings to free up any rust that might prevent them from turning. Using a brass punch/drift I slowly tapped away at the locking rings till they were almost free and hit the pockets with the vacuum again as a lot of rust dust broke loose during the tapping. I pulled the pump sending unit out carefully to keep the pump sock on and noted its orientation. I had to do some additional cleaning in the sending unit pocket to get the rest of the crud out. I pressed on the new pump’s sock filter, placed the new o-ring on the tank, dropped in the new unit, locked it in place with the new locking ring and snapped the harness plug on. I then pulled and replaced my fuel gauge sending unit in the same manner. One note, the locking rings from LRS required a slight amount of grinding on their outer diameter, because they were bigger than my tank’s ring inner diameters. Strange, but workable. I then re-installed the tank in the reverse steps of pulling it out. I was able to hoist the tank back in place using the cargo straps, which worked really nicely and really kept the tank nice and stable, yet allowed it to move while I had to manipulate it to get the filler neck back into the tank.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_01_tank removal.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	126.0 KB 
ID:	42738Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_02.1_tank removal.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	108.5 KB 
ID:	42739Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_02_tank removal.jpg 
Views:	22 
Size:	99.2 KB 
ID:	42740Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_03_gauge sending unit.jpg 
Views:	27 
Size:	105.7 KB 
ID:	42741Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_06_gauge sending unit.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	123.4 KB 
ID:	42742Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_07_gauge sending unit.jpg 
Views:	22 
Size:	89.9 KB 
ID:	42743Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_08_gauge sending unit.jpg 
Views:	23 
Size:	106.6 KB 
ID:	42744Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_09_pump sump.jpg 
Views:	26 
Size:	99.4 KB 
ID:	42745Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_10_pump unit.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	160.5 KB 
ID:	42746Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_11_pump unit.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	102.8 KB 
ID:	42747
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  5. #20
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C

    Walbro 255LPH High Pressure Fuel Pump w/Fuel gauge sending unit #2

    • The fuel gauge sending unit from LRS (#LRS-9275A) was labeled and ink stamped with Ford numbers (E3ZF-9275-CA/07-18-06/E3ZF AA), but I am not sure if was an OEM or aftermarket piece. So far it is still working just fine, so I am not worried about it. It is nice to have a working fuel gauge rather than watching my odometer and figuring out about how much fuel I might have left. My gauge would work fine from full to 1/2 tank, then things would go wacky where it would show ~3/8 tank then suddenly drop to below E…not good on highway road trips to and from the Reunions, let me tell you. Luckily I never ran out of fuel, but one Reunion fill up I did hit 15.3 gallons on our 15.4 gallon tank…WHEW!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_05_gauge sending unit.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	79.6 KB 
ID:	42749Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_04_gauge sending unit.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	92.5 KB 
ID:	42748Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fuel_12_pump unit.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	108.8 KB 
ID:	42750

    • At the same time I also replaced the fuel filter, while I was under the car and already smelled like fuel. I would suggest replacing yours at the same time, especially if it has been a while since you threw one in. Good luck on your tank adventures.
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  6. #21
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C

    Kirban Adjustable Fuel Pressure Regulator

    • If you plan on starting to push up to the 300hp level with your SVO, this one is a must modification to keep things ‘safe’ from a fuel supply on top of the 255lph pump upgrade. I was able to put down 252rwhp/298rwtq with the stock regulator and 155lph pump, but the wide band at the dyno showed I was running out of fuel on the top end of the rpm band. I had no easy way to increase my fuel w/o an adjustable regulator. Many years ago I purchased/installed a Paxton adjustable regulator, but apparently those regulators were not designed for anything much over 12psi and I ended up with a fairly expensive paper weight out of it. This time around I went with a tried and true regulator that has been on the market for some time now, a Kirban unit. The unit is a quality piece and best of all it is rebuildable, unlike my previous piece. The only part about the unit that I did not like was the fact it came with regular carbon steel screws, rather than something that might hold up a bit better in the cosmetic department. I swapped out the body screws/washers for blue anodized aluminum screws and plain aluminum split lock washers to snaz up its look a bit and avoid any rusting of the original units. I chose stainless steel screw/washers for the fuel rail mounting screws, since there are less mounting screws than on the body and I wanted to ensure I wouldn’t have any strength issues.

    • The swap is very straight forward for this, but you still need to pay attention to details as you are working with gasoline filled components here. Start by depressurizing the fuel system by the following steps; 1) Remove your gas cap from the filler neck, 2) Connect a vacuum pump to your stock regulator’s vacuum port and apply some vacuum, which will allow any built up pressure before the regulator bleed back to the tank and 3) Locate the Schrader valve on the fuel lines by the firewall, cup or support with an absorbent rag and carefully depress the Schrader valve pin to make sure the system’s pressure is bleed off (be VERY CAREFUL with this step). An alternate method is to disconnect your fuel pump relay under the driver’s seat, start the car and let it stall out by using up the fuel in the lines, again checking for pressure with the Schrader valve as noted above. Disconnect the vacuum line from the stock regulator and anything else that may get in the way of your Allen wrench for unscrewing the regulator mounting screws. I disconnected my spark plug wires, PCV valve line and also the front two fuel injector harness plugs. Place something absorbent under the regulator and remove the regulator’s mounting screws. Don’t be surprised when some fuel comes out of the regulator, this is normal and it can only hold a limited amount. Next make sure the stock regulator gasket is not left behind on the manifold, then place your new Kirban unit on manifold mounting plate and install the mounting screws and lock washers making sure they are tight. Go ahead and re-attach everything you moved out of the way, connect the vacuum line to the regulator port and make sure you loosen the adjustment rod’s lock nut. Cycle the ignition key 3-4x to build the system’s pressure and fill the new regulator. Look around the regulator to ensure you don’t have any fuel leaking! Check to see what pressure you are getting (you have a pressure gauge, right!?!) and adjust up/down to the stock regulator’s pressure. Now start the car and adjust the pressure to where you want it and tighten down the locknut. When you set your base fuel pressure, you need to disconnect and plug the vacuum line from the intake to get a consistent reliable base pressure reading. If you need more fuel, start by bumping up the pressure in 2-3psi increments and go from there. Good luck.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Regulator_01_Kirban_stock.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	57.7 KB 
ID:	42753 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Regulator_01_Kirban_modified.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	58.8 KB 
ID:	42752 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Regulator_01_Kirban_installed.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	122.4 KB 
ID:	42751
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  7. #22
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C

    Koni Rear Shock Replacements

    • This was a fairly straight-forward replacement project. Nothing too fancy, but well worth it once you get the new shocks dialed in (more on that later).

    • Here is my suggested method of replacement. Start by getting the rear of the car up in the air and support the car under the rear frame rails (i.e.- let the rear axle hang) with a good set of jackstands and don’t forget to chock the front tires in both directions. You don’t want to raise it too high, since you will need to get to the top of the shocks inside the rear hatch. Remove the rear wheels for more working room/clearance. Next remove the quad shocks from their mounts if you are replacing them as well (not a bad idea while you are there), otherwise you can leave the in place. Now move onto the main shocks by placing your jack under the rear carrier of the axle and bring it up just till you take some tension off of the shocks, since they are limiting how far you axle will droop. Now move to the inside of the hatch and remove the covers over the shock tops. Place a deep well socket onto the top mounting nut with a 6” extension or so to the ratchet handle. Try loosening the nut, but check to see if the shock top is spinning. You can generally hold the body with one hand and work the ratchet with the other till the nut comes off the stud and remove the washer and bushing as well. If your shocks are as worn as mine were, the top will slowly self-compress downward, if not it should stay sticking up into the shock tower. Now you can loosen/remove the lower mounting screw/nut and pull the old shock out. I also suggest doing one side at a time, so you have the other side as a reference.

    • Now the new Koni quad shocks are not adjustable, just plug-n-play, but the Koni rear shocks are actually adjustable. Unfortunately not as easily adjustable as the front struts. To adjust the rears it is easiest to do with them off the car where you can exert enough pressure to compress them to engage the adjustment detent. I place the top end down on a piece of wood, so you don’t damage the mounting stud’s tip or threads, and press down on the bottom mounting flange till you fully compress the shock. Slowly turn the bottom section clockwise, while preventing the top section from turning, till you feel the body drop into the adjustment detent. Turn it till you feel it stop, then back it off to your final setting. The total adjustment range is something like 3-4 turns, which is less than the fronts. Going full stiff with the new units will feel like you just put in a solid bar for shocks, trust me, I tried it and just about lost a filling on a test ride. My suggested setting is based on my personal preference and trial experience, so you may have a more preferred setting. My original setting was 1/2 turn off full soft. During a couple open track events I noticed the usual heavy brake dust on the front wheels and my rears were almost completely clean. I also had the usual Fox tail in the air under hard straight line braking. Talking to a couple of Fox body track guys, they suggested stiffening up the rear shocks, so I tried it. I found that setting it to ~1/4-1/2 turn off full stiff allowed for a fairly compliant street ride along with a much better balanced braking behavior during my open track events. Moving to this setting put a LOT more brake dust on the rear wheels, which means that the rear brakes were able to do more work under hard braking and I noticed the rear seemed much less squirrelly approaching the corners, which helped me go into the corners much more settled and with more speed (hurray!).

    • Install is pretty much the reverse of the removal noted above. It may take a few blocks of driving to get the shocks to settle in and the rear to settle down to normal ride height, but you will be very happy with the results. I should have not waited till I hit 100K miles to put my new rears on. I replaced the front struts @ ~70K miles and one of them was completely shot, so consider that for your car…it may be time. Good luck with your project.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Rear Shocks - Comparison_01.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	102.2 KB 
ID:	42754 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Rear Shocks - Comparison_02.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	136.0 KB 
ID:	42755 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Rear Shocks - Comparison_03.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	133.2 KB 
ID:	42756 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Rear Shocks - Original_01.jpg 
Views:	31 
Size:	79.2 KB 
ID:	42758 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Rear Shocks - Installed_01.jpg 
Views:	24 
Size:	98.5 KB 
ID:	42757
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  8. #23
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C

    Driving Lights

    • Driving lights…you love’m, you hate’m, but darn ain’t they good looking?!? Technically our ‘auxiliary’ lights are known as driving, not fog lights. The difference between the two is the light beam pattern. Fog lights have a narrow/long beam pattern, while driving lights have a wide/short beam pattern. This pattern is set by the lens on the unit. But enough about the type of our Marchal lights, onto the install/upgrade.

    • First is the install of the H2 bulb into the socket/holder. Our bulbs are placed onto a couple of flat metal posts and held in place with spring tabs. While this is fine in a perfect world, our vehicles live in the real world. If your spring tabs look pitted and burned, they have taken on a task that they were really designed to do, which is conduct the 55W current to the bulb’s filament. That task is supposed to be handled by the flat posts, but can get disrupted by vibrations and most likely corrosion between the surface of the post and bulb terminal. Over time the surface corrodes, which increases the resistance between the two and drives up the current requirement to light the bulb. Since electricity is ‘lazy’ it will always take the path of least resistance, which then becomes the contact between the spring tab and bulb terminal. The spring tab is very thin and its contact patch with the bulb’s terminal is very, very tiny. This causes a lot of heat and can effectively melt/burn a hole in the spring tab. I looked at this setup and tried to come up with a durable solution that can be easily serviced to facilitate a bulb replacement down the line. My solution was to clean the surfaces of the terminal posts to promote an efficient current path and create a clamp that would hold the bulb tight to the terminal better than the small spring tabs. I took some small strips of 26-gauge galvanized sheet metal and bent them in a U-shape just slightly narrower than the thickness of the terminal/bulb, slid them over the terminal/bulb by squeezing them on with a pair of pliers and gave a light squeeze with the pliers to set them in place. Simple, yet removable. My bulbs have been in place for at least 10 years w/o any more burnt terminal syndrome.

    Pic 1: stock H2 bulb, Pic 2: burnt sample front, Pic 3: burnt sample rear, Pic 4: OK sample front, Pic 5: OK sample rear, Pic 6: sheet metal clips front, Pic 7: sheet metal clips rear.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - Bulb_H2_Driving.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	130.3 KB 
ID:	42769 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - Socket_Marchal_Burned_01.jpg 
Views:	7 
Size:	72.1 KB 
ID:	42770 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - Socket_Marchal_Burned_02.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	94.5 KB 
ID:	42771 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - Socket_Marchal_Slightly Used_01.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	82.4 KB 
ID:	42772 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - Socket_Marchal_Slightly Used_02.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	68.0 KB 
ID:	42773 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - SocketAssy_Marchal_Clips_01.jpg 
Views:	6 
Size:	106.8 KB 
ID:	42774 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Light - SocketAssy_Marchal_Clips_02.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	113.2 KB 
ID:	42775

    • Talking about burnt terminal syndrome, the increased resistance in the bulb interface drives the light circuit amperage draw through the roof. When this happens, you tend to burn out your driving/fog lamp switch, because some Ford Engineer back in the day decided to run the lights’ current draw through the switch rather than isolating the power from the switch circuit with a relay. I placed a relay in my driving light circuit to separate the lights’ power draw from the console switch and put it right under the center console next to the switch. I pulled power for the switch side of the relay circuit from the interior dash light power supply, so I could turn on the driving lights with just the parking lights on, rather than having them only work when the headlights are on. The other side of the switch circuit runs to a chassis ground behind the dash. I used the wires that were originally the power in/out on the switch on the isolated/power side of the relay and called it a day. Since then I have not had any switch/power issues.
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  9. #24
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C

    Headlight Bulbs

    • Now I know this subject can turn into a real controversial/heated discussion, so take my chat here as just that, my personal opinion and experience. You are free to draw your own conclusions and go with what you feel is ‘best’ for your situation. I did plenty of research on a website run by Daniel Stern, who appears to be a real life lighting ‘guru’ if you will. I have even chatted via email with Daniel about our SVO’s lighting system and its advantages/drawbacks. It is interesting to note that he new exactly what our SVO’s are and even the fact that the early models have the recessed/bulb system and the later models have the flush housing setup, as that was one of the first questions he fired to me when I mentioned my specific application of an SVO without mentioning the year…pretty cool IMHO.

    • But I digress. For a few years I ran generic “all-weather” bulbs in my car, which gave a yellow appearance to the light pattern and a ‘unique’ look my SVO in the dark. Issue with the generic units was they did not use a true dichrotic coating on the bulbs, which caused the off-angle light to be a purple/blue color and set up an almost rainbow look to my lights from a side view. The couple of times I ran them in the rain, they didn’t light up the road as well as the stock bulbs. This prompted my research and contact with Daniel mentioned above. Based on his recommendation and my reluctance to swap my flush headlights over to the recessed versions, which apparently have a much superior upgrade capability, I moved over to a set of ‘cool blue’ Sylvania bulbs. The color of the light difference to the stock halogen units is very subtle, but they do appear ‘whiter’ in color without looking like the fake bluish imitation HID units on the market. I have also run these bulbs in the rain and can say that they appear to work as well, if not slightly better than the stock halogen units. I will let you make your own conclusions from the pics. Good luck with your headlight adventures.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	My86_AllWeathers.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	123.3 KB 
ID:	42776 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	My86_CoolBlues.jpg 
Views:	18 
Size:	127.0 KB 
ID:	42777
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  10. #25
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C

    Ignition Switch & Lock Cylinder

    • This project seems very challenging when you start it, but it isn’t nearly as difficult as I first thought once I got into it. My SVO had the random ignition cut-out syndrome where it was like someone would randomly turn off the ignition at seemingly random times. The tell-tale sign of the ignition switch’s failure was when the car would simply shut off for 1-5 seconds the tach would drop to zero. This indicates that the ignition circuit is losing power rather than a fuel pump, injectors or something fuel related. The symptoms are similar to a failing PIP sensor in the dizzy, but when the PIP starts to go your tach doesn’t drop to zero as the engine shuts off, it slowly decreases to zero as the engine RPM decreases.

    • To start the project you need some simple hand tools, a Dremel w/cutoff wheel or hacksaw, dielectric grease, your new ignition switch and optionally new lock cylinder.

    • Dis-assembly started with removing the driver’s side fuzzy dash panel; remove the lower dash panel under the steering column; remove the snap-on, trim ring that goes over the steering wheel tilt stalk; then remove the steering column cover to expose the components for replacement.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ignition Switch - Start.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	99.3 KB 
ID:	42778

    • I decided to replace my lock cylinder since I was in there and the cost was minimal. Start by disconnecting the battery, as you will be actuating the ignition switch/cylinder for this. Disconnect the cylinder harness connector; insert the ignition key and turn to the “run” position; use a small screwdriver or punch and insert into the hole on the bottom side of the cylinder housing to release the retaining pin; pull the lock cylinder out of the housing. Installation is the reverse of the removal, but you won’t need a small screwdriver/punch.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ignition Switch - Lock Cylinder Removal_01.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	62.0 KB 
ID:	42779 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ignition Switch - Lock Cylinder.jpg 
Views:	12 
Size:	99.5 KB 
ID:	42780

    • Next comes the replacement of the ignition switch, which is the root cause of the issue described above and was the root cause of my random cutout issue. Disconnect the wiring harness connector from the switch. The factory installed switch fasteners are “tamper resistant” screws where their drive heads break off during installation. You can actually reuse them or replace them with ‘regular’ screws, as I did. Cut a slot in the head of the screw with either the Dremel cutoff wheel or a hacksaw, which allows them to be loosened with a flat screwdriver to remove the screws. Installation is simply reverse from the removal, just remember to align the new switch’s slide to the actuator pin when putting it into place (i.e.- don’t force it).

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ignition Switch - Switch Removal_01.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	128.7 KB 
ID:	42781 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ignition Switch - Switch Removal_02.jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	104.9 KB 
ID:	42782 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ignition Switch - Switch Removal_03.jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	113.6 KB 
ID:	42783 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ignition Switch - Switch.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	72.0 KB 
ID:	42784 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ignition Switch - Switch_02.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	128.8 KB 
ID:	42785 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ignition Switch - Switch_04.jpg 
Views:	10 
Size:	90.5 KB 
ID:	42787

    • Once the new cylinder/switch is in place verify that it is working properly BEFORE putting all the trim pieces back on. Reconnect the battery and test that everything functions as expected. Now all you need to do is reinstall all the trim pieces in the reverse order you took them off in and ta-da, you have a reliable ride once again.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Ignition Switch - Complete.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	121.7 KB 
ID:	42788
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  11. #26
    14 PSI Boost
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ooltewah, TN
    Posts
    83
    SVO's: 1985 1/2 9L
    Hey Ted,

    What springs do you have on your car?

    With the 17x8 ET35 TSW wheels and the 245R40 tires don't you have excess clearance on the inside rear to the inner fender, and wouldn't it be even more if the quad-shock were removed? I am considering a set of 17" wheels but I am tempted to buy different offsets for the front and back in order to maximize the available space as I will be removing the quad shocks when I install a Steeda 5-link setup.

    Thx

  12. #27
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C
    ciscokid, just so I don't sidetrack this thread I have answered your questions in this thread:

    http://www.svoca.com/forum/showthrea...-my-SVO/page22
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  13. #28
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C

    Fays2 Watts Link #1

    I didn't take a ton of pics of the install, since it spanned ~5 days after work and a weekend, but hopefully it can give you an idea of the install.

    • This is one project you need to be ready for BEFORE you start taking things apart. It is quite involved and can even cause minor fits of madness during the process if you don’t take your time. Don’t attempt to start this project a couple days before you need to do something with your SVO…trust me on this! Due to the scope of this project I was very meticulous with my reading of the installation instructions supplied with the Watts Link and went over things 2-3x before proceeding including making sure I had all the right tools. Even with my planning I still ran into a few snags that required some additional legwork.

    • One of the things I considered before purchasing the Fays2 unit was the inherent bind in the factory rear suspension. As you may or may not know our rear quadra-link suspension is nicknamed a ‘quadra-bind’ suspension for a very good reason. The upper control arms are run at opposing angles to help locate the rear axle’s side-to-side movement and require flexing of those arms and bushings to allow vertical motion of the rear axle. Back in 1993 I installed polyurethane bushings in all (8) positions on the rear arms along with box welding the upper arms when I was into drag racing. This worked well to remove most of the ‘slop’ out of my suspension for drag launches, but also induced some serious bind as the suspension tried to compress. When the rear suspension binds, it will induce snap oversteer when turning corners. I ended up performing some ‘exciting’ spinouts on several occasions on the street when one of my rear tires would hit a bump mid-corner. I knew I had to correct this before my first track day with the SVOCA in 2003 at the TGPRC. I replaced my poly bushed/boxed upper control arms with a set of Ebay sourced stock rubber bushed/un-boxed uppers. The ride was much more compliant and I didn’t have any snap oversteer issues at the SVOCA track day or on the street. While that setup had been in my car for the past 8 years with no ‘exciting’ moments at numerous track days and auto-x events, I felt I wanted an even better setup (i.e.- Watts link or Panhard bar). I did a lot of research and made a few phone calls to chat with suppliers/mfg’s of these products. My final decision was to go with a Watts link system, specifically the Fays2 unit.

    • With the Fays2 taking care of the side-to-side duties, I knew I didn’t want it competing with the upper arms and again inducing rear suspension bind and the resulting snap oversteer. A lot of folks have created the PM3L (Poor Man’s 3-Link) by removing one of the upper arms to remove the binding motion. In theory this does seem to work, I personally don’t like it as the stresses of the windup are now concentrated on a single chassis mounting point. My preferred method was to go with a set of upper arms that have a swivel joint (i.e.- rod end) so you symmetrically control the windup of the rear axle during either acceleration or deceleration across two chassis points. I selected a pair of UMI upper control arms with their Roto-Joint on the chassis end. These arms have very little side-to-side holding capabilities and don’t appear to conflict with the Fays2 watts link. You can read up a bit more in the next project report on those.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Full Install_Rear 34_00.jpg 
Views:	30 
Size:	97.6 KB 
ID:	43126 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Full Install_Rear 34_01.jpg 
Views:	31 
Size:	178.5 KB 
ID:	43127 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Full Install_Rear 34_02.jpg 
Views:	31 
Size:	129.2 KB 
ID:	43128 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Full Install_Rear 34_03.jpg 
Views:	33 
Size:	149.6 KB 
ID:	43129
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  14. #29
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C

    Fays2 Watts Link #2

    • I started the install by getting my car up on jack stands and supporting the car level to its normal stance on the ground along with supporting the axle up at its normal ride height (this is very important for install). Make sure your car is stable on said jack stands, no need to make a trip to the local emergency room a step in this process! I then removed my tailpipes from my mufflers to give me working room to assemble/mount the Fays2 unit. If you can’t remove your tailpipes, then you will need to at least drop it so it can hang on the top of the axle housing for clearance. Next was the removal of the factory upper control arms and installation of the UMI upper arms (see next project for details). Now remove your quad and axle shocks from the car along with the quad mounting brackets from the frame rails. Fays2 instructions have you leave your axle shocks mounted to the car, but it was much easier to drill the frame rail holes by removing them. Bring the support frame up and into place while keeping tabs on your fuel supply/return lines. This step is much easier if you have an extra set of hands to help, but can be done with one person. The quad shock bracket mounting screws allow a bit of play in the frame, so I shifted it where it had the best clearance to the fuel filter/lines, then locked down the screws to set the position for drilling the front mounting screws. The Fays2 instructions detail drilling the frame rails to accept the front flange shoulder screws and lock the frame in place. The frame is a very rigid piece and truly becomes an extension of your rear frame rails.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Watts Frame_01.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	190.9 KB 
ID:	43130 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Watts Frame_02.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	181.2 KB 
ID:	43131 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Watts Frame_03.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	183.2 KB 
ID:	43132 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Watts Frame_04.jpg 
Views:	22 
Size:	168.0 KB 
ID:	43133
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

  15. #30
    OVER-BOOST!! svono50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Streamwood, IL
    Posts
    3,909
    SVO's: 86 1C

    Fays2 Watts Link #3

    • Now I moved over to the axle side of the system to bolt on the two axle mounts. The clamp-on style mounts are designed for 3” axle tubes, but come with a set of spacers that allow the lugs to fit onto 2.75” tube axle assemblies. Even though I have an 8.8 unit in my car it must be an earlier model that came with 2.75” axle tubes, so the spacers were needed for my install. Of course the passenger side spacer required some modification to work properly as can be seen in the pics. With all the pivot points and adjustability in the system you will need to take your time putting everything together. I highly suggest putting everything together loose enough to hold position, but not locking it down till you are sure everything is lined up properly. After spending half my initial time loosening things up to realign I finally figured out this ‘secret’.

    • I put the driver’s side mount in an approximate side-to-side location and perfectly horizontal. Having a digital angle finder is invaluable for the install, especially one with magnetic mounts. I then loosely fitted the passenger side mount aligning it over the axle tube vent, the mount is notched specifically for this. I pre-assembled the Watts bars to the rod ends to the propeller. Following the instructions I figured out which position to put the propeller pivot bolt into the Watts frame along with the proper angle of the propeller, again using the digital angle finder. The propeller assembly determined where the driver’s side mount had to be located and snugged into place. Using the angle of the driver’s Watts bar as a guide the position of the passenger side mount could be determined. The bars use spacers between the mount and rod ends to make the bars parallel to the axle tubes when looking from the side of the vehicle. As it turned out the spacers supplied with the unit were not quite enough to bring both bars parallel, so I ended up sourcing some locally, but you can call up and request additional spacers from Fays2. You need the proper amount of spacers to lock in the position of the passenger side mount due to its angled position. One issue I did run into was the length of the screws for the axle mounts. When fully tightened the screw tips barely touched the nylon lock ring in the nuts, so they were not really long enough. From my Engineering and assembly experience, the tip of a screw should extend at least one diameter beyond the back side of the nut. I ended up sourcing some Grade 8 screws that were ½” longer which took care of the length issue and ensured the nylon locking ring on the nut was actually doing something. Final length was 3 ½” for reference.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Axle Mount_Passenger_Spacer_01.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	154.1 KB 
ID:	43134 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Axle Mount_Passenger_Spacer_02.jpg 
Views:	13 
Size:	233.3 KB 
ID:	43135 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Axle Mount_Passenger_Spacer_03.jpg 
Views:	15 
Size:	242.5 KB 
ID:	43136 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Axle Mount_Passenger_Spacer_04.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	188.0 KB 
ID:	43137

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Axle Mount_Passenger_Screws-Spacer.jpg 
Views:	20 
Size:	204.9 KB 
ID:	43138 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Axle Mount_Passenger_Final.jpg 
Views:	19 
Size:	183.7 KB 
ID:	43139 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Watts Bar_Passenger_Final_01.jpg 
Views:	17 
Size:	137.4 KB 
ID:	43140 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Watts Bar_Passenger_Final_02.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	135.9 KB 
ID:	43141 Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Fays2 - Full Install_Driver_00.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	153.2 KB 
ID:	43142
    Ted
    86 SVO Mustang
    17 Cooper S Clubman ALL4

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •